Abstract zum Kolloquium

Dear all,

Due to train connection issues, Mariel Goddu’s talk today (December 1st) has been postponed to 13:00 and will take place in room 2.111 at Waldweg 26.

Best wishes, Feride


Dear all,

Here is the title & abstract of Mariel Goddu’s talk (December 1st, 12:15):

Having a sense of the possible
In this talk, I am going to share some preliminary ideas for a philosophical project grounded in cognitive science that aims to answer the following question: 
What sorts of cognitive capacities are involved in recognizing an „opportunity for action“? The talk has three parts.
In Part 1 (brief!), I am going to review considerations from evolutionary biology to make three uncontroversial claims: 1. Animals must act to live; 2. Acting involves being able to recognize opportunities for action; thus, 3. „Recognizing opportunities for action“ is a basic function of animal minds. This third point sets up the epistemological project: What does it mean to recognize an opportunity for action? What type of knowledge or belief does this require?
Then, in Part 2 (bulk!), I will review some key claims of an in-progress psychology review paper on the development of human-unique causal learning and reasoning. The literature reviewed suggests that both non-human animals and human children before the age of 4 do not have an objective understanding of causality––i.e., they do not view world events outside of their first-personal perspective in terms of generative causal relations, where certain events make other events happen. They only seem to have this sense about their own actions.
In Part 3 (speculation!), I will summarize why the „causal deficit“ suggested by the literature review is interesting, from two perspectives: 1. the question, „What is modal reasoning?“ from cognitive science, & 2. the question, „What is the (fundamental) ‚content‘ of cognition?“ from evolutionary epistemology. 

Please register (see the link below) at the latest by Monday, November 28th, if you’d like to meet and/or have dinner with our guest speakers.

Registration form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScYLaWXitidOd1rWIT1AOkAl3YlVhVWwDMgXFkt3FyjME1j0w/viewform?usp=sf_link

Best wishes and have a nice weekend,

Feride

Flohmarkt „Students 4 Students“

Flohmarkt – Samstag, 10.12. – ab 10:00 Uhr – Zentralmensa-Foyer

Die frisch gegründete NGO „Students 4 Students“, die sich für sozial gerechteren, nachhaltigen Naturschutz ohne post-koloniale Machtstrukturen einsetzt, veranstaltet am Samstag, 10.12.2022 von 10:00 bis 14:00 Uhr einen Flohmarkt im Foyer der Zentralmensa. Dazu möchten wir euch alle ganz herzlich als Gäste, Verkäufer*innen und/oder Helfer*innen einladen! 🙂
Wenn ihr selbst etwas los werden wollt, habt ihr dafür folgende zwei Möglichkeiten: Ihr könnt für 5€ Standgebühr euren eigenen Stand anmelden, wir stellen die Tische und ihr könnt alle Einnahmen aus dem Verkauf behalten. Meldet euch dafür am besten rechtzeitig im voraus per E-Mail bei uns an: s4students@web.de
Alternativ könnt ihr Kleidung, Schmuck und Deko-Artikel auch einfach an uns spenden, wir verkaufen die dann vor Ort an unserem Stand und die Einnahmen gehen – wie alle Einnahmen der Veranstaltung – als Spenden an unsere NGO. 🙂 Weitere Informationen über Students 4 Students erhaltet ihr auf unserer Homepage: https://students4students.jimdosite.com

Einladung zum Kolloquium

Dear all,

You are invited to two talks that will take place in early December.

On December 1st, Mariel Goddu will give a talk at CogSci colloquium (at 12:15, Waldweg 26 Room 6.103). She will talk about causal reasoning. Title & Abstract will be forwarded soon.

On December 8th, Jonathan Phillips will give a talk at a joint RTG 2070 & CogSci Colloquium (at 12:15, Waldweg 26 Room 6.103):

Decomposing Modal Thought

Cognitive scientists have become increasingly interested in understanding how natural minds represent and reason about possible ways the world may be. However, there is currently little agreement on how to understand this remarkable capacity for ‘modal thought’. Drawing on formal frameworks for reasoning about possibilities from logic, philosophy, computer science, and linguistics, we argue that this capacity is built from a set of relatively simple component parts, centrally involving a basic ability to consider possible extensions of a piece of the actual world. Natural minds can productively combine this basic ability with a range of other capacities, eventually allowing for the observed suite of increasingly more sophisticated ways of reasoning about what is possible. We demonstrate how this (de)compositional account can accurately predict both what has been observed in the trajectory of children’s developing capacity to reason about possibilities and what has been observed in how modal thought is expressed within and across natural languages. Our hope is that this framework will provide cognitive scientists with a more systematic way of understanding variation in actuality-directed modal thought and talk, which will serve as the beginnings of a common language that allows researchers across disciplines to better understand each other.

Both speakers have agreed to have few single/small-group meetings after/before their talks. If you are interested in meeting with them, please register by Friday (November 25) by filling out this registration form:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScYLaWXitidOd1rWIT1AOkAl3YlVhVWwDMgXFkt3FyjME1j0w/viewform?usp=sf_link

We are also organizing no-host dinners with the speakers on December 1st (with Mariel Goddu) and on December 7th (with Jonathan Phillips; please note that the dinner with him will take place one day before his talk). Please register via the aforementioned form if you’d like to join us at dinners.

Best wishes,

Feride

Einladung zum Kolloquium

Dear all,

We would like to invite you to the next ANaP lab colloquium by Raymundo Baez (German Primate Center) on Wednesday (Nov. 30) at 16:15. Please find the title, abstract and information about the venue below.

 Title: Prefrontal Mechanisms for Group Behavior.

 Abstract: As a group-living species, our actions and that of others affect each other’s fitness, for example, by reciprocating an action or by conforming to the group’s choices. Furthermore, the ability to predict and make sense of other’s actions, or Theory of Mind, plays a fundamental role in our social interactions. Notwithstanding the importance of group behavior and theory of mind to individual fitness, their neuronal mechanisms remain unexplored. To start addressing this gap, we performed a series of studies in different group-living species. Our unique multi-species approach allows capitalizing on the unique advantages that different species confer to study the neuronal mechanisms of social cognition. In one study, a group of mice foraged for food while we surreptitiously introduced confederate mice to induce bias in the focal mouse away or towards a food patch. In a second, a triad of macaques performed a structured reciprocity-based social task in which individuals offered a food reward to one of the other two. Finally, humans performed the canonical false belief task in a verbal format. We recorded neuronal activity from the PFC during task performance in all species. Neurons in the dmPFC of foraging mice encoded features that defined the groups’ behavior, including chosen direction, consensus, and bias. At the same time, other neurons reflected the recorded animal’s behavior. Together, these populations predicted the recorded animal’s conformity to the group. Monkeys preferred to give reward to individuals that reciprocated. Distinct subpopulations of dmPFC neurons reflected both the actor and reward recipient’s identity in the current and previous trial. Moreover, using a decoding approach and electrical stimulation showed that dmPFC activity can predict the animal’s upcoming decisions. Finally, we identified single neurons in the human dmPFC that encode information about others’ beliefs, distinguish between self and other-beliefs, and predict whether these beliefs are true or false. These findings reveal that neurons in the prefrontal cortex play a role in representing what others might think and do during social interactions and how the self decides to act accordingly. Together, these studies highlight the prefrontal cortex’s role in social interactions, the advantages of a multi-species approach, and lay the groundwork for studying the neuronal mechanisms of social cognition.

Venue: GEMI, seminar room 1.136

We are looking forward to seeing you at our colloquium. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.

Kind regards,

Yasaman Rafiee

Online Sprechstunde Psychotherapie-Ausbildung

Online Sprechstunde Psychotherapie-Ausbildung am 22.11.22 von 18:15 – 19:15
Liebe Studierende,
vielleicht spielen Sie mit dem Gedanken, später als Psychotherapeut*in zu arbeiten, wissen aber noch nicht so richtig, wie das mit der Psychotherapie-Ausbildung funktioniert, welche Ausbildungen es gibt, wo man die machen kann, wie das mit der Kohle ist und wann Sie sich entscheiden müssen? Dann laden wir Sie herzlich zu einer Online-Sprechstunde ein, bei der wir Ihnen gern helfen, Antworten auf Ihre Fragen zu finden. Wie im letzten Jahr stehen Ihnen dafür mehrere approbierte und angehende Psychotherapeut*innen zur Verfügung.
Mit von der Partie sind: A. Habermann (Lou Andreas-Salome Institut Göttingen), B. Phlix und D. Hoffer (Psychotherapeutinnen in Ausbildung), F. Gringmuth-Dallmer (Psychotherapeut in eigener Praxis), B. Nyenhuis und A. Klich (Psychotherapeut*innen, Ambulanzleitung des Therapie- und Beratungszentrums, Mitglieder der Psychotherapeutenkammer Niedersachsen), T. Brockmeyer (Leitung Abteilung Klinische Psychologie u. Psychotherapie, TBZ u. WSPP)
Meeting ID: 696 2356 1228
Passcode: 196620

Einladung zum Kolloquium

Dear all,

Here is a reminder for tomorrow’s talk titled „Social Aversion and The Face. How we represent and react towards unpleasant interaction partners“ by Vanessa Mitschke at 15:30. Please note that the talk will take place in seminar room 1.136 (GEMI).

We are looking forward to seeing you there!

Best wishes, 

Yasaman 


Dear all,

We would like to invite you to the next ANaP lab colloquium by Vanessa Mitschke (University of Würzburg) on Wednesday (Nov. 16) at 15:30. Please find the title, abstract, and information about the venue below.

Title: Social Aversion and The Face. How we represent and react towards unpleasant interaction partners.

Abstract: In the realm of this talk I will provide an overview of three different study lines investigating changes in muscular responses and visual representations due to experienced or expected unpleasantness of an interaction partner.

I hate your face. Changes in the visual mental representation of opponent faces due to conflict. In a serious of studies, we investigated the changes in visual representations of others based on experienced aggressive conflict and emotional reactions. Resulting in less favorable face representation after experienced unpleasantness.

You smile and I do not reply. Timing and voluntary suppression of forced smiles towards disliked targets. In a series of studies, we present evidence of more efficient response inhibition of facial muscular activation towards disliked targets in a go/nogo task.

Your face gives me the creeps. An exploratory investigation of visual and social cues of creepiness. In this preliminary study we examined the social and visual cues that underlie perceptions of ambivalent and unpleasant others.

Venue: Seminar room 1.134, GEMI (Goßlerstraße 14, 37073 Göttingen)

We are looking forward to seeing you at our colloquium. If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.

Kind regards,
Yasaman Rafiee

[Dieser Beitrag wurde zuerst am 01.11.22 veröffentlicht.]

Einladung zum Kolloquium

Dear all,

Unfortunately, this talk (Nov. 17) has been cancelled due to unexpected organizational issues. We apologize for any inconvenience and will inform you about the new time and date.

Kind regards,

Yasaman Rafiee


Dear all,

We would like to invite you to a talk by Ronja Demel (Humboldt University of Berlin) titled:

 Can the solidarity gap be closed?

Empathy as predictor for migration friendly policies, tolerance towards differing opinions, and feeling closer to outgroups in times of war.

The talk will take place on Thursday (Nov. 17) at 16:30, GEMI (seminar room 1.134).

Kind regards,

Yasaman Rafiee

Studierendenprojekt Europäisches Filmfestival Göttingen

Liebe Studierende – wir brauchen Unterstützung!

Anstelle eines fiktiven Praxisbeispiels bieten wir ein echtes Projekt, das im Rahmen des Studiums begleitet und untersucht werden kann: das Europäische Filmfestival Göttingen (25.11.-04.12.22).

Wir wünschen uns ein unterstützendes Team aus mehreren Studierenden, die sich vor und um das EFG verbindlich damit auseinandersetzen und uns dabei begleiten, den Status Quo, sowie Veränderungen zu untersuchen.

Es ist uns ein Bedürfnis, Wissen darüber zu erlangen:
–  wie bekannt die Marke/das Festival ist (differenziert nach Altersgruppen),
– wie unsere Werbemittel wirken und wie viel Reichweite diese haben,
– wer das EFG besucht und warum,
– wer das EFG nicht besucht und warum nicht,
– wer das EFG nicht besucht, dies aber gerne würde,
– welches Potential das Film-Buddies Feature in diesem Jahr hat …

Eine Erhebung dieser Informationen stellen wir uns in Form von Umfragen und Interviews vor, sind allerdings auch offen für weitere Impulse. Wir sind uns der Kurzfristigkeit bewusst und freuen uns umso mehr über eine Kooperation.

Weitere Informationen zum Festival gibt es unter: www.filmfest-goettingen.de

Sollten wir Interesse geweckt haben, sind wir zu erreichen unter:

buero@goettinger-kurzfimfestival.de

(0551) 50766431

Ansprechpartnerin: Johanna Franka Schleipen